'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled Beer drinkers are a loyal bunch, so when one of their favorite microbrews, Vermonster, got entangled in a copyright dispute they fought back on the Internet. Now the fight between the small Vermont brewery and the maker of Monster energy drinks has been settled.
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'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled

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'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled

'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled

'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114068612/114068592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beer drinkers are a loyal bunch, so when one of their favorite microbrews, Vermonster, got entangled in a copyright dispute they fought back on the Internet. Now the fight between the small Vermont brewery and the maker of Monster energy drinks has been settled.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And from Vermont Public Radio, Charlotte Albright has more.

CHARLOTTE ALBRIGHT: Hansen accused him of unfairly embedding its trademark name - Monster - in his new, high-alcohol brand Vermonster beer.

M: What do you mean, cease and desist? I'm not doing anything wrong. So certainly at first I was scared, you know. What do you do?

ALBRIGHT: For NPR News, I'm Charlotte Albright in northern Vermont.

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Correction Oct. 28, 2009

In early on-air versions of this story, we described the dispute as a copyright dispute. That is incorrect. It is a trademark dispute.