Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn What compels hundreds of thousands of runners to compete in marathons every year? Ira Flatow and guests discuss running research — from how humans are adapted specifically for long-distance running to why working up a sweat might be good for the brain, as well as the body.
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Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn

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Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn

Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn

Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn

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What compels hundreds of thousands of runners to compete in marathons every year? Ira Flatow and guests discuss running research — from how humans are adapted specifically for long-distance running to why working up a sweat might be good for the brain, as well as the body.

Guests:

Daniel E. Lieberman, professor, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

John Ratey, M.D., author, Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain, clinical associate professor of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass.