Seeing Anger A new study shows abused children are more likely to perceive anger in ambiguous emotional expressions than non-abused children. University of Wisconsin researchers asked children with and without histories of severe physical abuse to distinguish between facial expressions that differed only slightly. The physically abused children tended to see anger much more readily. NPR's Michelle Trudeau reports for All Things Considered. (4:00) See the study.
NPR logo

Seeing Anger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1145214/145214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Seeing Anger

Seeing Anger

Seeing Anger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1145214/145214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A new study shows abused children are more likely to perceive anger in ambiguous emotional expressions than non-abused children. University of Wisconsin researchers asked children with and without histories of severe physical abuse to distinguish between facial expressions that differed only slightly. The physically abused children tended to see anger much more readily. NPR's Michelle Trudeau reports for All Things Considered. (4:00) See the study.