Unrest in Rural China Mao Zedong built a communist revolution on the discontent of the rural masses, 80 percent of China's population. Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms brought growing prosperity to peasants by allowing them to sell some of their produce for profit. But China today has directed its attention toward investors and entrepreneurs rather than farmers, and the boom in rural living standards has slowed. Compounding the problem is corruption among local officials and grain surpluses that are likely to worsen under WTO. Scattered demonstrations are an early sign of growing restlessness among the peasants. NPR's Rob Gifford reports from the Chinese countryside.
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Unrest in Rural China

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Unrest in Rural China

Unrest in Rural China

Unrest in Rural China

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1145217/145217" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mao Zedong built a communist revolution on the discontent of the rural masses, 80 percent of China's population. Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms brought growing prosperity to peasants by allowing them to sell some of their produce for profit. But China today has directed its attention toward investors and entrepreneurs rather than farmers, and the boom in rural living standards has slowed. Compounding the problem is corruption among local officials and grain surpluses that are likely to worsen under WTO. Scattered demonstrations are an early sign of growing restlessness among the peasants. NPR's Rob Gifford reports from the Chinese countryside.