American RadioWorks: Rwanda's Revolutionary Justice Eight years after the genocide in Rwanda, an international tribunal has tried and convicted only 10 people -- more than 115,000 suspects are still in prison awaiting trial. To save time, Rwanda will experiment in what it calls "revolutionary justice." More than 10,000 open-air people's courts, called gacacas, will soon begin hearing genocide cases. Deborah George reports for American RadioWorks.
NPR logo

American RadioWorks: Rwanda's Revolutionary Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148219/148219" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
American RadioWorks: Rwanda's Revolutionary Justice

American RadioWorks: Rwanda's Revolutionary Justice

American RadioWorks: Rwanda's Revolutionary Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148219/148219" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Eight years after the genocide in Rwanda, an international tribunal has tried and convicted only 10 people — more than 115,000 suspects are still in prison awaiting trial. To save time, Rwanda will experiment in what it calls "revolutionary justice." More than 10,000 open-air people's courts, called gacacas, will soon begin hearing genocide cases. Deborah George reports for American RadioWorks.