Seattle Profile Jacki speaks with David Heath, a reporter at the Seattle Times, about James Ujaama, who was charged yesterday with conspiring to support al Qaeda terrorists. A federal grand jury in Seattle indicted Ujaama for allegedly planning to set up an al Qaeda training camp in southern Oregon. Ujaama claims he is innocent and that he was arrested last month in Denver under false pretenses. He does not fit the stereotype of an al Qaeda member. He is known as a youth activist and a family man. But since his conversion to Islam in 1996, he has studied with radical London imam Abu Hamza al-Masri, who has been linked to Zacarias Moussaoui and Richard Reid. Ujaana also set up a Web site attacking U.S. foreign policy.
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Seattle Profile

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Seattle Profile

Seattle Profile

Seattle Profile

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Jacki speaks with David Heath, a reporter at the Seattle Times, about James Ujaama, who was charged yesterday with conspiring to support al Qaeda terrorists. A federal grand jury in Seattle indicted Ujaama for allegedly planning to set up an al Qaeda training camp in southern Oregon. Ujaama claims he is innocent and that he was arrested last month in Denver under false pretenses. He does not fit the stereotype of an al Qaeda member. He is known as a youth activist and a family man. But since his conversion to Islam in 1996, he has studied with radical London imam Abu Hamza al-Masri, who has been linked to Zacarias Moussaoui and Richard Reid. Ujaana also set up a Web site attacking U.S. foreign policy.