New Process Mimics Natural Fertilization Scientists are developing a new way to help infertile women have babies. A mature cell from the woman's body is merged with a chromosome-free egg, to which sperm is later added. The scientists insist the process is not cloning, but works very much like fertilization in nature. The procedure is still in the embryonic phases, and physicians in other parts of the world have confirmed the promise of the operation. NPR's Joe Palca reports.
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New Process Mimics Natural Fertilization

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New Process Mimics Natural Fertilization

New Process Mimics Natural Fertilization

New Process Mimics Natural Fertilization

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1151733/151733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Scientists are developing a new way to help infertile women have babies. A mature cell from the woman's body is merged with a chromosome-free egg, to which sperm is later added. The scientists insist the process is not cloning, but works very much like fertilization in nature. The procedure is still in the embryonic phases, and physicians in other parts of the world have confirmed the promise of the operation. NPR's Joe Palca reports.