Personal Web Pages Hit by Cyber Bullies A new poll from the Pew Internet Project says that a third of teenagers have been harassed online, a tactic called cyber-bullying. The abuse mostly takes the form of spreading rumors and disclosing private messages.
NPR logo

Personal Web Pages Hit by Cyber Bullies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11688835/11688836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Personal Web Pages Hit by Cyber Bullies

Personal Web Pages Hit by Cyber Bullies

Personal Web Pages Hit by Cyber Bullies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11688835/11688836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new poll from the Pew Internet Project says that a third of teenagers have been harassed online, a tactic called cyber-bullying. The abuse mostly takes the form of spreading rumors and disclosing private messages.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Nearly every presidential candidate has a MySpace page. Maybe they should take note of a new poll from the Pew Internet Project. It says a third of teenagers had been harassed online. So our last word in business today is cyber bullying. That means spreading rumors and disclosing private messages. Of course, for politicians, that pretty much goes with the territory.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

JOHN YDSTIE, host:

And I'm John Ydstie.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.