Former Soldier Helps Others Fight Army for Help Andrew Pogany, a former soldier who struggled with a mental breakdown in Iraq, has become a driving force behind efforts to make the Army revise its response to soldiers suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Former Soldier Helps Others Fight Army for Help

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Former Soldier Helps Others Fight Army for Help

Former Soldier Helps Others Fight Army for Help

Former Soldier Helps Others Fight Army for Help

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11782535/11783731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Former soldier Andrew Pogany, shown in his home basement office, gets dozens of calls a day from soldiers with serious mental health problems who need help dealing with the Army. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

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Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Former soldier Andrew Pogany, shown in his home basement office, gets dozens of calls a day from soldiers with serious mental health problems who need help dealing with the Army.

Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Andrew Pogany (center) finishes up a breakfast meeting with Fort Carson soldier Ryan LeCompte and his wife, Tammie. They contacted Pogany because they say supervisors punished LeCompte instead of helping him get treatment for PTSD. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

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Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Andrew Pogany (center) finishes up a breakfast meeting with Fort Carson soldier Ryan LeCompte and his wife, Tammie. They contacted Pogany because they say supervisors punished LeCompte instead of helping him get treatment for PTSD.

Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Maj. Gen. Robert Mixon, one of the top commanders who run Fort Carson, says the Army's handling of PTSD cases is changing. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

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Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Maj. Gen. Robert Mixon, one of the top commanders who run Fort Carson, says the Army's handling of PTSD cases is changing.

Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

A G.I. Joe action figure in Pogany's home office serves as a reminder of his service in the Army. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

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Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

A G.I. Joe action figure in Pogany's home office serves as a reminder of his service in the Army.

Daniel Zwerdling, NPR