Music Business Still Groping for a Digital-Age Plan Midyear music sales figures are in. Not surprisingly, they're not good: CD sales are down from last year, and legitimate online sales are far outstripped by downloads for free. How will the industry cope in this new generation of digital media consumers?
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Music Business Still Groping for a Digital-Age Plan

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Music Business Still Groping for a Digital-Age Plan

Music Business Still Groping for a Digital-Age Plan

Music Business Still Groping for a Digital-Age Plan

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R&B artist Ne-Yo bucked industry trends this year with a No. 1 album that sold half a million copies. Def Jam Recordings hide caption

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Def Jam Recordings

R&B artist Ne-Yo bucked industry trends this year with a No. 1 album that sold half a million copies.

Def Jam Recordings

Eric Garland is the head of BigChampagne, a marketing research service for online media. hide caption

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Michael Bracy is the policy director for the Future of Music Coalition. hide caption

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