Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette Editorial cartoonist and Kudzu comic-strip creator Doug Marlette died July 10 in a Mississippi car accident. He was 57. His skewering of Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker helped earn him a Pulitzer Prize. This interview first aired on June 8, 1987.
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Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette

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Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette

Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette

Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11949189/11949194" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Doug Marlette was known for his comic strip Kudzu, but he was also a Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoonist — and the only cartoonist ever awarded the prestigious Nieman journalism fellowship. Will and Deni McIntyre hide caption

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Will and Deni McIntyre

Doug Marlette was known for his comic strip Kudzu, but he was also a Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoonist — and the only cartoonist ever awarded the prestigious Nieman journalism fellowship.

Will and Deni McIntyre

Editorial cartoonist and comic-strip creator Doug Marlette died July 10 in a Mississippi car accident. He was 57. For years he was the political cartoonist for the Charlotte Observer, based in the North Carolina city where Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker founded the PTL television ministry. His skewering of the Bakkers helped earn him a Pulitzer Prize. This interview first aired on June 8, 1987.

Marlette also created the syndicated comic strip Kudzu and wrote the novel The Bridge. When Terry Gross spoke to him in 1987, he had just written the book There's No Business Like Soul Business, featuring Kudzu's less-than-holy evangelist, the Reverend Will B. Dunn.