Students Build Living Microbial Machines At the 2009 International Genetically Engineered Machine competition, undergraduates from all over the world unveiled the living machines they'd created with snippets of DNA, from bacteria that change color when they detect pollutants to ones that secrete non-toxic superglue.
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Students Build Living Microbial Machines

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Students Build Living Microbial Machines

Students Build Living Microbial Machines

Students Build Living Microbial Machines

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Guests:

Catherine Goodman, judge, 2009 International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition, associate editor, Nature Chemical Biology, Cambridge, Mass.

Vivian Mullin, member, Cambridge University team, 2009 International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition, undergraduate, Biochemistry Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge, England