How Safe Is It? Seymour Hersh On Pakistan's Arsenal Pakistan has an estimated 80 to 100 nuclear warheads. How secure are they? Veteran investigative journalist Seymour Hersh talks with host Terry Gross about Pakistan's nuclear arsenal and what Pakistan and the U.S. are doing to keep it safe.
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How Safe Is It? Seymour Hersh On Pakistan's Arsenal

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How Safe Is It? Seymour Hersh On Pakistan's Arsenal

How Safe Is It? Seymour Hersh On Pakistan's Arsenal

How Safe Is It? Seymour Hersh On Pakistan's Arsenal

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120346497/120350118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Seymour Hersh was awarded the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for exposing the My Lai Massacre and its cover-up during the Vietnam War. Brad Barket/Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Barket/Getty Images

Seymour Hersh was awarded the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for exposing the My Lai Massacre and its cover-up during the Vietnam War.

Brad Barket/Getty Images

Pakistan has an estimated 80 to 100 nuclear warheads. How secure are they? What are the chances they could fall into the hands of the extremists currently challenging Pakistani authorities?

In an article for the November 16 edition of The New Yorker, investigative journalist Seymour Hersh writes about Pakistan's nuclear arsenal and what Pakistan and the U.S. are doing to keep it safe from extremists.

Hersh's article is called Defending the Arsenal: In an Unstable Pakistan, Can Nuclear Warheads Be Kept Safe? He is a regular contributor to the magazine on matters of security and the military.