Enough With The 40th Anniversaries Already The Internet at 40. Sesame Street at 40. Even the Wendy's hamburger turns 40. NPR producer Travis Larchuk tells Guy Raz he's had enough of the celebrations — and stages a 40th anniversary intervention.
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Enough With The 40th Anniversaries Already

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Enough With The 40th Anniversaries Already

Enough With The 40th Anniversaries Already

Enough With The 40th Anniversaries Already

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The Internet at 40. Sesame Street at 40. Even the Wendy's hamburger turns 40. NPR producer Travis Larchuk tells Guy Raz he's had enough of the celebrations — and stages a 40th anniversary intervention.

GUY RAZ, host:

Now, to another landmark moment 40 years ago. Dave Thomas opened the first Wendy's restaurant in Columbus, Ohio in November 1969, and ever since, square hamburger patties have become a part of our lives. Dave�

TRAVIS LARCHUK: Hey, guy, can I stop you for a second?

RAZ: What's the problem?

LARCHUK: I'll just tell you in the studio.

RAZ: Okay. This is Travis Larchuk. He's a producer on our show here.

What's the problem?

LARCHUK: Hi, Guy. Well, first of all, I want to say I'm a huge fan of your work.

RAZ: You work on the show.

LARCHUK: I know. You've been doing some really good stuff. And the reason I'm here right now is because I think we need to have a conversation about all of the 40th anniversary stories that we've been doing.

RAZ: And do we have to have it right now in the middle of the show?

LARCHUK: Yes, we do. Shawn(ph), can you hit it?

STEVE INSKEEP: This is the day 40 years ago when a small spaceship carrying Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin lifted off from�

Unidentified Man: This weekend marks the 40th anniversary of the Woodstock Festival.

RAZ: The 40th anniversary of a milestone event in the development of what we've come to know as the Internet.

INSKEEP: "Sesame Street" aired its first episode�

RENEE MONTAGNE: John Lennon and Yoko Ono's bed-in�

RAZ: The police raid on a bar called the Stonewall Inn�

Unidentified Woman: Comic-Con�

Unidentified Man: Easy Rider�

MICHELE NORRIS: Monty Python's Flying Circus�

RAZ: Dave Thomas opened the first Wendy's restaurant�

NEAL CONAN: Forty years ago, four guys in Los Angeles created a '40s-style radio detective with a twist.

LARCHUK: All that's from this year. All that's from 2009.

RAZ: So what? I mean, every year is the 40th anniversary of something.

LARCHUK: Well, Guy, you know I don't have opinions.

RAZ: Oh, right.

LARCHUK: But I did talk to someone who wrote an entire book all about what happened 40 years ago.

Mr. ROB KIRKPATRICK (Author, "1969: The Year Everything Changed"): My name is Rob Kirkpatrick, and I wrote "1969: The Year Everything Changed."

LARCHUK: "1969: The Year Everything Changed."

RAZ: Everything changed.

LARCHUK: Well, if you think about what was happening in the years leading up to 1969, you have the Vietnam War dragging on, you had the summer of love, you had the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, and then Nixon gets elected.

Mr. KIRKPATRICK: That was the political and the social backdrop to what was happening in the culture where the music was changing, movies were changing. The whole country changed. I like to say that '69 was the year the dial really got turned up on the decade.

LARCHUK: So, you got things like�

Mr. KIRKPATRICK: The weather underground, "Abbey Road," the Beatles last recording, the Battle of Hamburger Hill, "The Brady Bunch" debuted, the armed takeover of�

RAZ: Okay. I get it, I get it. 1969 was really busy, and it's the 40th anniversary of a really busy year. I get it.

LARCHUK: Yes. So, I guess in 2019, we can do it all over again for the 50th anniversary.

RAZ: That sounds great. That's one of our producers, Travis Larchuk.

Travis, I assume you can show yourself out of the studio.

LARCHUK: I can. Thank you, Guy.

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