Bones In House Probably Not From Any Crime A real estate agent in Gibson, La., was showing a home to a prospective buyer. Apparently the house had not been properly staged. When the realtor and buyer reached the basement, they discovered human bones. The coroner's office tells The Courier of Houma there's probably no crime. The bones may come from an old burial ground.
NPR logo

Bones In House Probably Not From Any Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120809303/120545139" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bones In House Probably Not From Any Crime

Bones In House Probably Not From Any Crime

Bones In House Probably Not From Any Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120809303/120545139" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A real estate agent in Gibson, La., was showing a home to a prospective buyer. Apparently the house had not been properly staged. When the realtor and buyer reached the basement, they discovered human bones. The coroner's office tells The Courier of Houma there's probably no crime. The bones may come from an old burial ground.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A real estate agent in Gibson, Louisiana was showing a home to a prospective buyer. Apparently the house had not been properly staged. When realtor and buyer reached the basement they discovered a pile of human bones. The coroner's office says there's probably no crime. The bones may come from an ancient Indian burial ground, which means there's nothing to worry about, nothing at all, so long as the buyers never saw the movie "Poltergeist."

You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.