Your Letters: Dangerous Highways, Norman Rockwell Host Liane Hansen reads listener letters about last week's segments on dangerous highways, Norman Rockwell and an eco-friendly Christmas.
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Your Letters: Dangerous Highways, Norman Rockwell

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Your Letters: Dangerous Highways, Norman Rockwell

Your Letters: Dangerous Highways, Norman Rockwell

Your Letters: Dangerous Highways, Norman Rockwell

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Host Liane Hansen reads listener letters about last week's segments on dangerous highways, Norman Rockwell and an eco-friendly Christmas.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters.

Last week, we wrapped up a weeklong series on highway safety with a report about the dangers of Utah's Highway 6, a road that's had more than 500 fatal or serious crashes since 1996. A number of you wrote to suggest that officials lower the speed limit on Highway 6.

Margaret Carey(ph) left a comment on our Web site that aggressive driving is also to blame. She writes: There seems to be a fascination with dangerous passing. I have had to go off the road at least twice to avoid being hit head on by someone who could not get back in their own lane of traffic. Often drivers in the passer's lane close the gap as if to prove something to the passing car. Many drivers treat driving like a game.

Last week, guest host Jacki Lyden explored the little-known history behind the paintings of Norman Rockwell. The famed artist relied on posed photographs to create his paintings, drawing criticism from some in the arts community.

Artist Burt Cox(ph) of Philadelphia writes: Any tool that can help get the job done on time should, can and will be used by an illustrator. And if Rockwell were alive today, he would probably be using a computer like every other freelance illustrator on earth.

Also, last week we focused on an effort in some parts of the country to take the penny out of circulation. Troy Hill of Seattle, Washington writes: Tradition, history and old habits are not easily changed, but the penny has served its purpose, run its course and needs to be retired.

Alan Crocker(ph) wrote on our Web site: I own a store and I can't even begin to imagine the hassles involved with discontinuing the penny. Sales tax would be a nightmare. All this anti-penny contrarianism is pretty short-sighted, if you ask me.

Finally, a number of your wrote in after hearing Anna Getty, author of the book, "I'm Dreaming of a Green Christmas," suggest that cuttings down a tree is more environmentally friendly than purchasing a plastic one. Several of you pointed out a third option - buying a live tree that can be planted after the holiday season.

Tom Arnold of Eugene, Oregon writes: Not only is this an environmentally superior option for all the obvious reasons, but it also offers a focal point to remember warm, close times with loved ones.

We want to hear from you. Go to NPR.org and click the link that says Contact Us. You can also reach us on Twitter. I'm at NPRLiane, and the rest of the WEEKEND EDITION staff is at NPRWeekend - all one word. You can also join the conversation on Facebook at Facebook.com/NPRWeekend.

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