Wild Cows Cloned NPR's Melissa Block talks with Dr. Robert Lanza about the successful cloning of a pair of endangered bantengs, born a week ago. The banteng is a wild cow from Southeast Asia. Fewer than 8,000 are thought to exist. The pair of calves were cloned with DNA from a banteng which died 23 years ago at the San Diego Zoo. The experiment was a collaboration including Advanced cell Technology, the San Diego Zoo, Iowa State University and Trans Ova Genetic. Dr. Lanza is medical director and vice president of Advanced Cell Technology.
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Wild Cows Cloned

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Wild Cows Cloned

Wild Cows Cloned

Wild Cows Cloned

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1225049/1225050" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Melissa Block talks with Dr. Robert Lanza about the successful cloning of a pair of endangered bantengs, born a week ago. The banteng is a wild cow from Southeast Asia. Fewer than 8,000 are thought to exist. The pair of calves were cloned with DNA from a banteng which died 23 years ago at the San Diego Zoo. The experiment was a collaboration including Advanced cell Technology, the San Diego Zoo, Iowa State University and Trans Ova Genetic. Dr. Lanza is medical director and vice president of Advanced Cell Technology.