The Bloodsugars: Prom Night Bloodsugars singer-guitarist Jason Rabinowitz describes his group's latest album, I Can't Go On, I'll Go On, as "a modern prom playlist," and "The Pedestrian Boogie" makes it easy to understand what he means. Backed by a synth line that seems borrowed from Toto's 1983 hit "Africa," Rabinowitz's vocals ooze nostalgic yearning.
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'The Pedestrian Boogie' by The Bloodsugars

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The Bloodsugars: Prom Night

Review

The Bloodsugars: Prom Night

'The Pedestrian Boogie' by The Bloodsugars

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Bloodsugars singer-guitarist Jason Rabinowitz describes his group's latest album, I Can't Go On, I'll Go On, as "a modern prom playlist," and "The Pedestrian Boogie" makes it easy to understand what he means. Backed by a synth line that seems borrowed from Toto's 1983 hit "Africa," Rabinowitz's vocals ooze nostalgic yearning. Near the song's conclusion, he cries, "How we used to dance so slow / You and I." But until that point, the track is an appropriately melodramatic slow burn, full of surreal images, hand claps, stomps, a sinister bass line, "ooh ooh ooh ooh oohs" and those weepy, Toto IV-era keyboards.

Friday's Pick

  • Song: "The Pedestrian Boogie"
  • Artist: The Bloodsugars
  • CD: I Can't Go On, I'll Go On
  • Genre: Pop

"The Pedestrian Boogie" is an appropriately melodramatic piece that oozes nostalgic yearning. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

"The Pedestrian Boogie" is an appropriately melodramatic piece that oozes nostalgic yearning.

courtesy of the artist

Fans of unpretentious indie pop who aren't afraid to cheese out every once in a while can't do much better than The Bloodsugars, a Brooklyn band that merges a record library's worth of styles — from dance-pop to jazz to European-influenced house and garage — on its CDs. Still, for all its adventurism, the group seems most comfortable when it's indulging itself with sounds from its members' childhoods. It's a trick more bands should try.

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