Hits And Misses In Obama's Proposed Budget Renee Montagne talks with NPR News Analyst Cokie Roberts about what's being stressed in the White House budget plan and what isn't being talked about.
NPR logo

Hits And Misses In Obama's Proposed Budget

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/123202079/123202042" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Hits And Misses In Obama's Proposed Budget

Hits And Misses In Obama's Proposed Budget

Hits And Misses In Obama's Proposed Budget

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/123202079/123202042" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Renee Montagne talks with NPR News Analyst Cokie Roberts about what's being stressed in the White House budget plan and what isn't being talked about.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Let's get some analysis, now, from NPR's Cokie Roberts. Good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: And so we just heard Andrea talking about education spending. Over the last few weeks, we've been hearing more and more about the administration's plans to deal with education and less and less, as it happens, about health care. What is that all about?

ROBERTS: Or maybe they just absolutely determined to oppose the president on everything, even if they agree with him. So, this will be a test for that.

MONTAGNE: Do you think, though, Cokie, that the Obama administration has given up on the health care issue?

ROBERTS: It's just the election of Scott Brown, the Republican senator in Massachusetts, just took all of the air out of the issue.

MONTAGNE: And Scott Brown was on his first Sunday talk show, yesterday. From your point of view, what did we learn? The senator's now quite pivotal?

ROBERTS: Now, that's going to be a real issue inside the Republican Party - whether they can go with people like Scott Brown in other states or whether the purists in the party, and the tea party folks, and all of that, are going to insist on a more conservative Republican. And that's going to be playing out in this election year in ways that could be very harmful to the Republican Party.

MONTAGNE: Although, President Obama tried to cross party lines by going to a Republican retreat on Friday - sort of going to the lion's den, although...

ROBERTS: Right.

MONTAGNE: ...although in this case, it turned into quite a lively give and take.

ROBERTS: It was. It really was interesting to see. It was almost like watching the British parliament when the prime minister goes in for question time, from the opposition. And Obama, I think, really came out of this, really, better than the Republicans, because there were cameras there. So he was there, looking like he was ready to take on their questions and be friendly, and they did have to play to those purists in the party and be very tough on him. So, they didn't look terribly friendly and I'm not sure that works for them.

MONTAGNE: And you are listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.