What Toyota Owners Should Know About Pedal Repair Renee Montagne talks with Consumer Reports auto analyst Mike Quincy about what owners of recalled Toyota vehicles should know about the accelerator pedal repair Toyota announced will be available through local dealers this week.
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What Toyota Owners Should Know About Pedal Repair

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What Toyota Owners Should Know About Pedal Repair

What Toyota Owners Should Know About Pedal Repair

What Toyota Owners Should Know About Pedal Repair

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Renee Montagne talks with Consumer Reports auto analyst Mike Quincy about what owners of recalled Toyota vehicles should know about the accelerator pedal repair Toyota announced will be available through local dealers this week.

Q: What should Toyota owners do in the meantime? Mike Quincy is an automotive specialist at Consumer Reports, and he joins us now. Good morning.

MIKE QUINCY: Good morning.

: Now, this is a particularly, I think peculiarly scary problem, not being able to control the acceleration of your car. How concerned would you be if you were the owner of a recalled Toyota?

QUINCY: But if the car is driving as normal as always, I wouldn't be overly concerned.

: But just momentarily though, people would want to know what would you do, what's the best way to respond if your car in fact does accelerate?

QUINCY: At that point, then you can turn off your engine and then put it in park. Definitely get the car towed though. Don't continue driving it.

: Well, let's go back to something we were just hearing from Frank's story. Is the repair Toyota announced, in your opinion, likely to fix the problem?

QUINCY: It's likely to fix the problem because between the government and Toyota, they've given their approval that this is an appropriate fix. Whether or not it actually works on a mass scale basis, it's difficult to tell, probably impossible to tell. If complaints continue to rack up, people are still concerned about it, then it didn't work. But in my judgment, if the government has given its nod, then this fix is good to go.

: And although you were just talking a moment ago about the odds of almost, you know, of anything bad happening - how does a company like Toyota make the calculation that this fix is safe enough?

QUINCY: We have no doubt that these are, you know, structurally sound, fundamentally good cars. But, you know, can this fix work 100 percent of the time? You know, I hope so. I imagine it will because the engineers that put these things together have to anticipate, you know, these things working.

: Well, then does that mean that once Toyota actually finishes fixing this accelerator problem as it's designed the fix, would you, Consumer Reports, once again recommend these models?

QUINCY: Once the fix has been done, the parts are getting into customers' cars and the cars go back on sale, we can foresee us lifting our ban on recommended Toyotas. I mean, we can see putting our recommended label back on Toyotas once the fix is done and the cars are back on sale.

: Thank you very much for joining us.

QUINCY: Thank you.

: Mike Quincy is an automotive specialist at Consumer Reports.

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