Typo Leaves Taylor Swift Fans Disappointed A Liverpool newspaper announced that country star Taylor Swift would be performing at a local Catholic primary school. The paper meant to say Taylor Bright. Swift just won a Grammy; 16-year-old Taylor Bright went to England to promote her first single. Her tour is now minus one concert — called off because of security concerns.
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Typo Leaves Taylor Swift Fans Disappointed

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Typo Leaves Taylor Swift Fans Disappointed

Typo Leaves Taylor Swift Fans Disappointed

Typo Leaves Taylor Swift Fans Disappointed

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A Liverpool newspaper announced that country star Taylor Swift would be performing at a local Catholic primary school. The paper meant to say Taylor Bright. Swift just won a Grammy; 16-year-old Taylor Bright went to England to promote her first single. Her tour is now minus one concert — called off because of security concerns.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

A case of two Taylors turned out to be too good to be true for some school children in England. A Liverpool newspaper announced that country star Taylor Swift would be performing at a local Catholic primary school. The paper meant to say Taylor Bright. Taylor Swift just won a Grammy for Best Album. Sixteen-year-old Taylor Bright came to England to promote her first single. Bright's tour is now minus one school concert, called off because of security concerns.

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