Super Bowl Beer Ad Benefits Chicago Business Miller High Life used its Super Bowl ad-buy this past Sunday to shine a light on some small businesses across the U.S. Tim's Baseball Card Shop on Chicago's North Side was one of them. The response has been overwhelming.
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Super Bowl Beer Ad Benefits Chicago Business

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Super Bowl Beer Ad Benefits Chicago Business

Super Bowl Beer Ad Benefits Chicago Business

Super Bowl Beer Ad Benefits Chicago Business

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Miller High Life used its Super Bowl ad-buy this past Sunday to shine a light on some small businesses across the U.S. Tim's Baseball Card Shop on Chicago's North Side was one of them. The response has been overwhelming.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Chicago Public Radio's Adriene Hill reports on what's happened since.

ADRIENE HILL: Unidentified Man: High Life has given us our commercial to help out our small business friends, Tim's Baseball Card Shop in Chicago.

(SOUNDBITE OF MILLER HIGH LIFE COMMERCIAL)

TIM HERRON: I'm Tim.

HILL: Tim is Tim Herron. The card shop is a small storefront on Chicago's North Side. And so far, he says the response to the ad and to his very few words, has been more than a little overwhelming. People are calling, writing, emailing - thousands of people have visited his Web site.

HERRON: It blows anything away that I could've done personally. I just advertise in the Yellow Pages, here locally.

HILL: Miller spokesman Julian Green says the company handpicked Herron by scanning Web sites of Small Business Associations and Chambers of Commerce.

JULIAN GREEN: We really thought that this particular collection of business were really authentic and it just used plain common sense to go on with their business.

HILL: For NPR News, I'm Adriene Hill in Chicago.

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