Auto Dealers Predict Sales Will Bounce Back In 2010 The National Automobile Dealers Association met for its annual convention over the weekend in Orlando, Fla. The group believes 2010 will be better than 2009, which was the worst year in nearly three decades. The reasons: consumers have put off buying cars for several years and now need them. Plus, easing credit and incentives make it easier to buy.
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Auto Dealers Predict Sales Will Bounce Back In 2010

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Auto Dealers Predict Sales Will Bounce Back In 2010

Auto Dealers Predict Sales Will Bounce Back In 2010

Auto Dealers Predict Sales Will Bounce Back In 2010

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The National Automobile Dealers Association met for its annual convention over the weekend in Orlando, Fla. The group believes 2010 will be better than 2009, which was the worst year in nearly three decades. The reasons: consumers have put off buying cars for several years and now need them. Plus, easing credit and incentives make it easier to buy.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

NPR's Ted Robbins reports.

TED ROBBINS: Paul Taylor is the chief economist for the National Automobile Dealers Association. He says the main reason more people will make what's typically their second biggest purchase is growing confidence that their biggest purchase, their home, won't depreciate much further.

WERTHEIMER: The other thing is, they've run the mileages up on many of these vehicles that they've tended to drive during the recession, and it's simply time to trade. Many of them will feel they can't drive the vehicle yet another year.

ROBBINS: Ted Robbins, NPR News.

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