Army Answers to Family Problems from War Dolores Johnson, director of Family Programs for the Army, says the Army is taking measures to help families better cope with the stresses of deployment and to prevent abuse. A new study shows an increase in the rate of child abuse when one parent is deployed.
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Army Answers to Family Problems from War

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Army Answers to Family Problems from War

Army Answers to Family Problems from War

Army Answers to Family Problems from War

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Dolores Johnson, director of Family Programs for the Army, says the Army is taking measures to help families better cope with the stresses of deployment and to prevent abuse.

A study of military families appearing in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association shows a disturbing increase in the rate of child abuse when one parent is on deployment.

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