Congress Asked to Mandate Vacation Time Pro-leisure group Take Back Your Time wants Congress to mandate three weeks paid vacation for all workers. But one recent survey shows that not only do U.S. workers earn fewer vacation days, but they also don't use an average of three days every year they're owed.
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Congress Asked to Mandate Vacation Time

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Congress Asked to Mandate Vacation Time

Congress Asked to Mandate Vacation Time

Congress Asked to Mandate Vacation Time

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Pro-leisure group Take Back Your Time wants Congress to mandate three weeks paid vacation for all workers. But one recent survey shows that not only do U.S. workers earn fewer vacation days, but they also don't use an average of three days every year they're owed.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

That Onion story is, of course, satirical, but one group is taking it seriously. Our last word in business today comes from a pro-leisure advocate called Take Back Your Time. Its call to action: protect vacations before they disappear altogether. This group wants Congress to mandate three weeks' paid vacation for all workers.

Still, even legislation may not be enough for American workaholics. One recent survey shows that not only do U.S. workers earn fewer vacations days. They also don't use an average of three days every year that they're owed. Of course that survey comes from the travel Web site Expedia.com. And it has an interest in getting Americans to take more vacation.

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