Italy Convicts Google Execs To Protect Privacy Europeans are debating the overall reach of the Internet into their lives. An Italian court recently convicted three Google executives for privacy violations after a clip was posted on Google Video showing a disabled student being bullied by classmates in Turin. The ruling highlights a deep trans-Atlantic cultural gap: Americans see the ruling as undermining the concept of freedom of expression, while Europeans put privacy first — they consider it a fundamental human right.
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Italy Convicts Google Execs To Protect Privacy

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Italy Convicts Google Execs To Protect Privacy

Italy Convicts Google Execs To Protect Privacy

Italy Convicts Google Execs To Protect Privacy

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Europeans are debating the overall reach of the Internet into their lives. An Italian court recently convicted three Google executives for privacy violations after a clip was posted on Google Video showing a disabled student being bullied by classmates in Turin. The ruling highlights a deep trans-Atlantic cultural gap: Americans see the ruling as undermining the concept of freedom of expression, while Europeans put privacy first — they consider it a fundamental human right.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli has this letter from Europe.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI: Sylvia Poggioli, NPR News, Rome.

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