Tattoos No Longer Reserved for the Rebellious Tattoos were once a signature mark of the disaffected and dangerous, but in recent years, body art has moved into the mainstream. Guests and callers discuss how tattoos became trendy, and whether employers need to re-think their policies about visible tattoos in the workplace.
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Tattoos No Longer Reserved for the Rebellious

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Tattoos No Longer Reserved for the Rebellious

Tattoos No Longer Reserved for the Rebellious

Tattoos No Longer Reserved for the Rebellious

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12449048/12449049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Ankle Tattoo
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Tattoos were once a signature mark of the disaffected and dangerous, but in recent years, body art has moved into the mainstream. Guests and callers discuss how tattoos became trendy, and whether employers need to re-think their policies about visible tattoos in the workplace.

Paul Roe, tattoo artist and historian; owner of Britishink Tattoo Studio and Gallery

Molly Selvin, author of "Better hide the tattoo if you want the job," published in the Los Angeles Times

Dr. Eric Bernstein, director of Laser Surgery and Cosmetic Dermatology Centers; clinical associate professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania