Squirrel in Finland Has Taste for Chocolate The manager of a food shop reports that a squirrel makes two trips each day to fetch a chocolate shelled egg called Kinder Surprise because there's a toy inside. The squirrel eats the chocolate, takes the toy, and with no parent there to enforce good manners, leaves the wrapper on the floor.
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Squirrel in Finland Has Taste for Chocolate

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Squirrel in Finland Has Taste for Chocolate

Squirrel in Finland Has Taste for Chocolate

Squirrel in Finland Has Taste for Chocolate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12476757/12476758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The manager of a food shop reports that a squirrel makes two trips each day to fetch a chocolate shelled egg called Kinder Surprise because there's a toy inside. The squirrel eats the chocolate, takes the toy, and with no parent there to enforce good manners, leaves the wrapper on the floor.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Squirrels like peanuts. We know that. Now news of a squirrel in Finland with a taste for chocolate. The manager of a food shop reports that a local squirrel makes two trips each day to fetch itself a particular chocolate-shelled egg they call Kinder Surprise, so named because there's a toy inside for kids. The squirrel eats the chocolate, takes the toy, and with no parent there to enforce good manners leaves the wrapper on the floor.

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