The Berlin Journal: March 2010 In this spring edition of The Berlin Journal, special guests are on hand from the American Academy's fellowship program. Guests include historian Joel Harrington, religious scholar Charles Marsh, and novelist Francisco Goldman.
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The Berlin Journal: March 2010

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The Berlin Journal: March 2010

The Berlin Journal: March 2010

The Berlin Journal: March 2010

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/124834029/124903611" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In this spring edition of The Berlin Journal, special guests are on hand from the American Academy's fellowship program.

Beginning the hour, Joel Harrington discusses Nuremberg state executioner Meister Frantz Schmidt. The 16th century executioner kept a journal, recording every death and corporal punishment in his 40 years of service. Harrington, a Professor of History at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, is currently writing a book on the journal. Harrington is interviewed by host R. Jay Magill.

The Berlin Journal continues with novelist Francisco Goldman, author of The Divine Husband and The Ordinary Seamen. Goldman is currently at work on another novel, Say Her Name, about his wife Aura Estrada, who died in 2007. Goldman is interviewed by Spiegel Online editor Michael Scott Moore.

Finishing out the hour is Charles Marsh, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. Marsh speaks with host R. Jay Magill about the German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who spent a year in America doing post graduate study at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. In 1930s New York, Bonhoeffer became familiar with African American spirituals and the poverty and oppression experienced in Harlem. Marsh is currently writing a biography of Bonhoeffer.