Maryland Celebrates First Day Of Spring In Maryland, where blizzards created record snows, yacht clubs bid so long to winter by burning their socks. On a warm, sunny day in Annapolis, hundreds threw them into the fire. Sailors in Baltimore broke with the tradition and took a less fiery approach. Members socked it to a sock-shaped pinata and sent a boatload of socks to a charity.
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Maryland Celebrates First Day Of Spring

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Maryland Celebrates First Day Of Spring

Maryland Celebrates First Day Of Spring

Maryland Celebrates First Day Of Spring

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In Maryland, where blizzards created record snows, yacht clubs bid so long to winter by burning their socks. On a warm, sunny day in Annapolis, hundreds threw them into the fire. Sailors in Baltimore broke with the tradition and took a less fiery approach. Members socked it to a sock-shaped pinata and sent a boatload of socks to a charity.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

After snow and more snow, East Coasters were really ready for the first day of spring. In Maryland, where blizzards brought record snows, yacht clubs have a tradition of bidding so-long to winter by burning their socks. On a warm and sunny day in Annapolis, hundreds threw them into a fire. A sailing club in Baltimore broke with the tradition and took a less fiery approach. Members socked it to a sock-shaped pinata and sent a boatload of their socks to charity.

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