Policing Iraq Today, hundreds of unarmed Iraqi police returned to the streets of Baghdad. The U.S. military has been policing Iraq with some unfortuate results. Last week, U.S. military personnel fired at Iraqi protesters in the central Iraqi town of Fallujah, killing more than a dozen people in two separate incidents. Host Lynn Neary speaks with Scott Feil, a retired Army colonel who served in the 1991 Gulf War and has worked on post-conflict security policy, about whether or not the military should or can serve as a policing force.
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Policing Iraq

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Policing Iraq

Policing Iraq

Policing Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1251825/1251826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Today, hundreds of unarmed Iraqi police returned to the streets of Baghdad. The U.S. military has been policing Iraq with some unfortuate results. Last week, U.S. military personnel fired at Iraqi protesters in the central Iraqi town of Fallujah, killing more than a dozen people in two separate incidents. Host Lynn Neary speaks with Scott Feil, a retired Army colonel who served in the 1991 Gulf War and has worked on post-conflict security policy, about whether or not the military should or can serve as a policing force.