Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week's news, including a new form of silent protest.

Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news, including a new form of silent protest.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

We want to remind everybody they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago. For tickets and more information, you can go to chicagopublicradio.org or you can find a link at our Web site waitwait.npr.org. Right now panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news.

Roxanne, the Tea Partiers weren't the only protestors in Washington last weekend. There was also a huge rally for immigration where a counter protestor got into a tussle with whom?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: A mascot?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: A fountain?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: Was it an inanimate object?

SAGAL: No, they were quite animate...

ROBERTS: Oh...

SAGAL: ...although silent.

ROBERTS: Animate but silent. I'm going to need a hint.

SAGAL: Well, police had no trouble tracking them because of their white faces, striped shirts and berets.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: Mimes.

SAGAL: Mimes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It was an immigration throw down. When anti-immigration activist Roy Beck left his home on Sunday he knew he'd encounter thousands of immigrants and pro-immigrant protestors marching around the mall. But he never expected a hostile troop of female mimes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Beck says that they harassed and insulted him and his bodyguards with, quote, "crushing physical intimidation," end quote.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: First, we suspect by placing them in invisible boxes...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...then blowing them backwards with imaginary winds.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is true. One of the bodyguards got fed up with the mimes, took out a knife and started popping their balloons, leading to his arrest on assault charges. The crafty mimes, however, eluded the cops by climbing an invisible ladder they'd brought with them to freedom.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: Were these French mimes?

SAGAL: No, no, no, these were all American mimes. This has totally got to destroy your cred when you go to like the anti-immigrant meetings. Like what happened to you at the protest? We didn't see you there. He's like yeah, well I was chased away by, well who? By, you know, LARASA, by roving gangs? Well, no, by mimes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But they made these faces at me and they were so cruel.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: But now on the list of protestors that I would pick, mimes would be very low because I would consider them relatively ineffectual.

TOM BODETT: Well and as a security force, I mean seriously.

SAGAL: No, no, no, haven't you ever read Saul Alinsky's "Rules for Radicals"? He says always bring mimes.

BODETT: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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