Your Letters: Perfect Martini; Too-Short Oscar Report Host Liane Hansen reads listener letters about Andy Trudeau's annual Oscar report and the perfect martini.
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Your Letters: Perfect Martini; Too-Short Oscar Report

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Your Letters: Perfect Martini; Too-Short Oscar Report

Your Letters: Perfect Martini; Too-Short Oscar Report

Your Letters: Perfect Martini; Too-Short Oscar Report

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/125274310/125274281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Host Liane Hansen reads listener letters about Andy Trudeau's annual Oscar report and the perfect martini.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Time now for your letters.

WEEKEND EDITION: I was very pleased to hear Ms. Wolf's commentary on the perfect martini. Once at a bar I ordered a martini, and to my indignant surprise, I was asked if I would like it raspberry flavored. It's good to know that at least one person still views the martini how is should be: classic.

HANSEN: I'd like to thank NPR and WEEKEND EDITION again for bringing Andy Trudeau to offer his sensible, intelligent and informative commentary. I am a film professor at the University of Colorado and I always make my students listen and try to understand what the movie music does. Extra brownie points for using the words score and soundscape as opposed to soundtrack, which is, technically speaking, incorrect to refer only to music.

HANSEN: We want to hear from you. Send us an email by going to NPR.org and clicking the link that says Contact Us, or send us a tweet. My Twitter name is NPRLiane - that's L-I-A-N-E - and our staff can be reached at NPRWeekend.

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