Study: Heart Scans Don't Motivate Lifestyle Changes People don't necessarily adopt healthier lifestyles after seeing the negative results of heart scans, according to research published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. The study suggests that coupling EBT scans, which reveal early signs of heart disease, with counseling is the best way to reduce the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Hear NPR's Patricia Neighmond.
NPR logo

Study: Heart Scans Don't Motivate Lifestyle Changes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1254227/1254228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Study: Heart Scans Don't Motivate Lifestyle Changes

Study: Heart Scans Don't Motivate Lifestyle Changes

Study: Heart Scans Don't Motivate Lifestyle Changes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1254227/1254228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People don't necessarily adopt healthier lifestyles after seeing the negative results of heart scans, according to research published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. The study suggests that coupling EBT scans, which reveal early signs of heart disease, with counseling is the best way to reduce the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Hear NPR's Patricia Neighmond.