Can Low-Flow Toilets Gain Consumer Confidence? Starting this summer, products that save water can earn a "Water Sense" label from the Environmental Protection Agency, akin to the Energy Star label for appliances. But will the label help American consumers feel better about water-conserving low-flow toilets?

Can Low-Flow Toilets Gain Consumer Confidence?

Can Low-Flow Toilets Gain Consumer Confidence?

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Could you trust this toilet? A man tests a water-saving toilet at the Beijing International Energy-Saving and Environmental Protection Exhibition in June. Poor performance by low-flow toilets has led some U.S. consumers to smuggle in alternatives from Canada. Getty Images hide caption

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Could you trust this toilet? A man tests a water-saving toilet at the Beijing International Energy-Saving and Environmental Protection Exhibition in June. Poor performance by low-flow toilets has led some U.S. consumers to smuggle in alternatives from Canada.

Getty Images

Starting this summer, products that save water can earn a "Water Sense" label from the Environmental Protection Agency, akin to the Energy Star label for appliances. But will the label help American consumers feel better about water-conserving low-flow toilets?

Thousands of Americans have smuggled illegal toilets from Canada to avoid using low-flow toilets that did not work as well as consumers wanted them to. But an Environmental Protection Agency official says that technology has come a long way since the first low-flow toilets were introduced.