The Life And Work Of Wassily Kandinsky Dr. Christopher With recently gave a talk at the Goethe-Institut in Washington, DC on the life of Wassily Kandinsky, the Russian-born abstract modern artist.
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The Life And Work Of Wassily Kandinsky

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The Life And Work Of Wassily Kandinsky

The Life And Work Of Wassily Kandinsky

The Life And Work Of Wassily Kandinsky

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/125920308/125990448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"Panel for Edwin R. Campbell, 1 to 4" by Wassily Kandinsky. Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images

"Panel for Edwin R. Campbell, 1 to 4" by Wassily Kandinsky.

Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images

Dr. Christopher With recently spoke at the American Goethe Society's lecture at the Goethe-Institut in Washington, D.C. on the life and work of Wassily Kandinsky, the Russian-born abstract modern artist.

Born in Moscow in 1866, Kandinsky left Russia to attend the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. After a short return to his native country during World War One, Kandinsky was soon persuaded to come back to Weimar Republic Germany to teach at the Bauhaus School. When the school was closed by the Nazis in 1933, Kandinksy left for France, where he lived until his death in 1944.

Kandinsky is often seen as one of the pioneers of abstract modern art. He was a founding member of The Blue Rider with August Macke and Franz Marc, had his work displayed and subsequently destroyed in the 1937 Nazi sponsored "Degenerate Art" show, and was a prolific writer on the subject of art theory.

Christopher With is Senior Lecturer Emeritus at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.