Planes, Trains, Automobiles And Volcanic Ash For many travelers stranded in Europe by the volcanic ash cloud, train travel is their way home. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli was supposed to hop a plane for Rome from Amsterdam. Four days later, she's made it as far as France.
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Planes, Trains, Automobiles And Volcanic Ash

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Planes, Trains, Automobiles And Volcanic Ash

Planes, Trains, Automobiles And Volcanic Ash

Planes, Trains, Automobiles And Volcanic Ash

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For many travelers stranded in Europe by the volcanic ash cloud, train travel is their way home. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli was supposed to hop a plane for Rome from Amsterdam. Four days later, she's made it as far as France.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Last Friday, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli was supposed to hop a plane for the two-and- a-half hour flight from Amsterdam to her home in Rome. The volcano in Iceland changed that. Four days later, she's still far from home.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI: By Saturday, the only option was the train. A three-hour wait at the ticket counter in The Hague, and the news was bleak. The only way to Rome was to travel first eastward, then down through Germany and Switzerland, changing trains six times. Estimated time of arrival: three days later. I took my chances, grabbed the last available ticket to Paris - convinced once there, I could hop a train to Rome. Fat chance.

INSKEEP: Sylvia Poggioli, NPR News, Nice.

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