Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: Gordon Brown gets caught being a typical politician, what Sarkozy and Citroen have in common, and a story we promise is true, Scout's Honor.
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

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More questions for the panel: Gordon Brown gets caught being a typical politician, what Sarkozy and Citroen have in common, and a story we promise is true, Scout's Honor.

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and Chicago Public Radio, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! the NPR news quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Amy Dickinson, Roy Blount Jr. and Keegan-Michael Key. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you all. In just a minute, Carl travels thousands of light years to bring us this week's limericks, thanks to a rift in the space rhyme continuum.

M: Oh.

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait Wait. That's 1-888- 924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Roy, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, in the fight of his life to keep his job in the election next week, now has another problem. On Wednesday, he had to publicly apologize to a voter on live TV for pretending to what?

M: Well, he pretended - I don't know what he was pretending. He got in the car; he didn't realize his mic was live and called her a bigot.

SAGAL: Right. But what we were suggesting was that he pretended to like her.

M: Oh, I see.

M: Oh.

SAGAL: But he did it on live TV.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: But you're right. It's been a tradition for ages. Politicians have pretended to like voters, then as soon as they get off alone, they reveal their true feelings.

M: Oh, yeah...

SAGAL: But Gordon Brown is the first one to wear a live, wireless mic throughout this Jekyll-and-Hyde transformation.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: He was mic'ed for video as he chatted on the street with one Jillian Duffy, a grandmother and lifelong Labor Party voter, who voiced her concerns about immigrants. Mr. Brown assured her it wasn't a problem, asked about her family, told her how wonderful it was to meet her. Then he got into his car and called her a quote, bigoted woman, and complained about having to talk to her, all the while transmitting his voice to the BBC.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: After the damning tape was broadcast over and over again on British television and the Internet, Brown had to go to Ms. Duffy's house and apologize to her in person. Walking away he said, quote: That will keep the little bigot happy - oh damn, I did it again.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: You know what I loved? When he got in the car, he said something like, who let me near that woman?

M: Right.

SAGAL: Exactly. Whose fault was that?

M: It was Ferguson's fault.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, I mean, I feel two things. First of all, sympathy, because we've all done that. But also, a little apprehension in that - do all the politicians do this? I mean, after telling us yes, we can, does Barack Obama turn to Rahm Emanuel and say that guy, that guy can't.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Amy, in France there's a bit of a scandal brewing. It all started when a European rental car company, trying to stir up interest in its Citroen hatchbacks, compared the diminutive French car to whom?

M: The British. No...

SAGAL: No. Remember, I said diminutive.

M: Right.

SAGAL: In France.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Right.

M: Ah.

SAGAL: It comes with a sidecar called the Carla, which is actually bigger...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Oh, the Sarkozy.

SAGAL: Yes, they compared it to the Sarkozy.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The company poster says, be like Madam Bruni, take a small French model.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Many expect a lawsuit from the thin- and tiny-skinned Sarkozy. Of course, someone has to pick him up so he can see the poster first.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is just the - we have some sympathy for him. This is just the latest indignity suffered by him in regard to cars. Thanks to French safety laws, Sarkozy has to travel in a rear-facing car seat.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: What if he drops his sippy cup?

SAGAL: I hate it when that happens. Keegan, in the latest sign that we've all just stopped trying, the Cub Scouts announced a new merit badge in what?

M: Oh, video games.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Technically, technically, it's not...

M: Gaming, yeah.

SAGAL: It's not a merit badge, but it's something called a belt loop. But the requirements to earn one of these things are quite onerous. For example - and these are real; I'm quoting from their manual - with your parents, create a plan to buy a video game that is right for your age group. So OK, steal Dad's credit card, click on Amazon, check, done.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here's another one, quote: With an adult's supervision, install a gaming system - like hey, mom, watch me as I plug this cord into the flat screen. There.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We can't help but see this as a somewhat threatening trend for our youth. Soon, there will be scouting awards for things like eating entire bags of chips.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Loitering. And finally, a scouting award for quitting scouting.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: Oh.

M: Wow.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: Who will tie our knots?

M: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Exactly.

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