Boil Water Order Lifted In Massachusetts A weekend water main break left 2 million Boston area residents without clean water. The break has been repaired and the governor told affected residents they could stop boiling their water.
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Boil Water Order Lifted In Massachusetts

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Boil Water Order Lifted In Massachusetts

Boil Water Order Lifted In Massachusetts

Boil Water Order Lifted In Massachusetts

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A weekend water main break left 2 million Boston area residents without clean water. The break has been repaired and the governor told affected residents they could stop boiling their water.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

TOVIA SMITH: When millions of gallons of water first erupted from a massive underground water pipe, things were looking pretty bad around Boston.

FRED LASKEY: You know, with 10 being the worst, this is a nine-and-a-half.

SMITH: Fred Laskey, head of Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, warned that untreated backup water could make people sick. And many, like Newton resident Bill Bizer(ph), were approaching panic.

BILL BIZER: I don't normally go and sort of say the sky's falling, but I sent text messages to a half dozen friends saying, you know, don't drink water unless its boiled.

SMITH: It didn't take long before stores were wiped out of bottled water. And those in towns with clean tap water were trying to sell it online. But by Monday morning, the pipe was fixed, and testing was underway. The major catastrophe became a minor inconvenience.

JACK SHEA: Unidentified Man: We don't have coffee.

SMITH: Jack Shea, who commutes into the Boston area, was one of those caught off guard at a Dunkin Donuts.

SHEA: I think it's going to be rough. Well, I'll make it through the day.

SMITH: Unidentified Child: Hey, I'm going potty.

SMITH: Toddlers at this Newton nursery school discovered their little sinks covered in construction paper and teachers passing out Purell.

INSKEEP: I don't want to use sanitizer.

SMITH: Tovia Smith, NPR News.

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