Letters: Hostages In Iran Robert Siegel and Michele Norris read from your letters about Monday's interview with the mother of one of the three American hikers detained in Iran. Why were they hiking near the Iranian border, anyway?
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Letters: Hostages In Iran

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Letters: Hostages In Iran

Letters: Hostages In Iran

Letters: Hostages In Iran

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Robert Siegel and Michele Norris read from your letters about Monday's interview with the mother of one of the three American hikers detained in Iran. Why were they hiking near the Iranian border, anyway?

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Now to your letters.

Yesterday, I interviewed Nora Shourd, the mother of Sarah Shourd, one of three American hikers who have been held in an Iranian prison for the past nine months. Well, a couple of you wanted to know a detail not provided in that interview. Magnes Westerven(ph) of New York City writes: You never even touched upon the heart of the matter. Who are these Americans, and what were they doing there? Seems a dashed odd place for an innocent hike, hence the rumors of them actually being spies, as the Iranians claim.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Well, Sarah Shourd's mother told us that Sarah had been teaching English in Syria. That's where her boyfriend, Shane Bauer, was living as a freelance journalist. And their friend, Josh Fattal, was apparently visiting them in the region when they all made the trip to northern Iraq. Their families say the hikers took a five-day vacation to the scenic mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan, and that they accidentally strayed across the Iranian border there. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton describes them as innocent tourists.

NORRIS: Also on yesterday's program, we marked the 100th birthday of a radio legend.

(Soundbite of music)

Mr. RAY BRADBURY (Author): The best way to describe Norman Corwin is, he was the greatest director, the greatest writer and the greatest producer in the history of radio.

NORRIS: Science fiction writer Ray Bradbury.

Mr. BRADBURY: There was nobody like him, nobody could touch what he did.

(Soundbite of radio show)

(Soundbite of music)

Mr. NORMAN CORWIN (Radio Personality): The four major networks again join to present the 12th in their series of broadcasts for wartime America, "To the Young," by Norman Corwin.

NORRIS: Lilly Lung(ph) of Holland, Massachusetts writes: It has been a while since a story so captivated me that it brought me to tears. Yet it was not tears of sadness. I think I was just so touched by the journey and the accomplishments of Mr. Corwin. I learned of him and his connection to America's past through your story. A splendid piece of journalism. Thank you so much.

SIEGEL: Well, if you hear something on the program that brings you to tears, the good kind or the bad, let us know. Visit NPR.org, and click on Contact Us at the bottom of the page.

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