U.S. Postal Service Resumes Delivery To Haiti Since a massive earthquake tore through Haiti in January, the U.S. Postal Service has been holding mail for delivery to Haiti. One ton of international letters and packages are on their way, with delivery expected by the weekend. That's one bit of good news in the almost four months since the quake claimed more than 200,000 lives, and left more than 2 million people homeless.
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U.S. Postal Service Resumes Delivery To Haiti

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U.S. Postal Service Resumes Delivery To Haiti

U.S. Postal Service Resumes Delivery To Haiti

U.S. Postal Service Resumes Delivery To Haiti

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Since a massive earthquake tore through Haiti in January, the U.S. Postal Service has been holding mail for delivery to Haiti. One ton of international letters and packages are on their way, with delivery expected by the weekend. That's one bit of good news in the almost four months since the quake claimed more than 200,000 lives, and left more than 2 million people homeless.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Jason, good morning.

JASON BEAUBIEN: Good morning.

INSKEEP: You seeing progress compared to your previous visits?

BEAUBIEN: But at the same time, you've still got hundreds of thousands of people living in camps, hundreds of thousands of people living in really still very desperate conditions. And a lot of the places you look, it looks like absolutely nothing has happened. So sort of yes and no on the progress.

INSKEEP: And there was a lot of concern about how people living out in the open were going to fair during the rainy season, which was supposed to begin last month. How are people doing?

BEAUBIEN: So the Haitians and humanitarian community really are not out of the woods yet by a long shot. And this remains a humanitarian catastrophe on a really large scale.

INSKEEP: We're talking with NPR's Jason Beaubien. He's in Port-au- Prince, Haiti, where many people have followed your reporting in previous months, Jason. I'm glad to hear you mention those schools in a box, suggesting that kids, at least some of them, can go to school. What about adults? Are there jobs for people to go to during the day?

BEAUBIEN: So people aren't working amidst the rubble. But you know, they are sleeping oftentimes still amidst it. They're working amidst it. And at times they're even playing right there, you know, in the heart of this shattered city.

INSKEEP: Okay. Thanks very much. That's NPR's Jason Beaubien. He's reporting this morning from Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

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