Iraq's Shiites Unite To Try To Form New Government Iraq's two big Shiite political groups say they have joined forces in a bid to form a new government. The move comes two months after the country's election. However, there are still obstacles to creating the coalition that would govern Iraq.
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Iraq's Shiites Unite To Try To Form New Government

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Iraq's Shiites Unite To Try To Form New Government

Iraq's Shiites Unite To Try To Form New Government

Iraq's Shiites Unite To Try To Form New Government

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/126522952/126522907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Iraq's two big Shiite political groups say they have joined forces in a bid to form a new government. The move comes two months after the country's election. However, there are still obstacles to creating the coalition that would govern Iraq.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Baghdad.

PETER KENYON: Unidentified Man: (Foreign language spoken)

KENYON: Hajim al-Hassani, a leading figure in Maliki's State of Law Party, said in an interview before the alliance was announced that it's one thing to create a mostly Shiite majority bloc in parliament known as the Council of Representatives. But actually forming the government will, in his view, require outreach to the Kurds, the Sunnis and others.

HAJIM AL: Formation of government is different issue. After you build the new coalition, you become the largest bloc in the Council of Representatives. Then you open two other groups to be part of the national unity government. And for us, in the (unintelligible) for that means, you know, you open to (unintelligible), you open to other small groups. You cannot exclude the Sunnis from being part of the government.

KENYON: At a briefing for reporters Sunday, U.S. political counselor Gary Grappo criticized the commission's actions.

GARY GRAPPO: We do remain concerned about the functions of this organization of questionable legitimacy employing something less than transparent means to challenge the results of a legitimate election. There's also a question of disenfranchisement of those who voted for these candidates.

KENYON: Peter Kenyon, NPR News, Baghdad.

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