Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: first up, a scandalous state seal.
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Opening Panel Round

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Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: first up, a scandalous state seal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news.

Faith, in the 18th century, some of our Founding Fathers created the state seal of Virginia, with its figure of Virtus, the Roman goddess of virtue. That may have been fine for back then, but the attorney general of Virginia just recently updated the seal by doing what?

M: Did they - was the goddess like, unclothed and did they clothe her?

SAGAL: Not anymore. Yes, exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

M: Right. Wow.

SAGAL: The attorney general changed the seal by covering up the goddess's exposed breast.

M: Who's the attorney general, Ashcroft?

SAGAL: No, actually, one of his disciples, apparently. As designed in 1776, the spirit of Virtue is dressed in the traditional toga, which exposes one breast.

M: I'll say.

SAGAL: According to myth, she only did this because Jupiter threw her some beads. But on these special lapel pins that Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli gave his staff, Virtus is wearing an armored breastplate, all covered up. After a lot of press, a few days later he announced that he was, quote, discontinuing future use of the pin, unquote.

H: Exchange a firm handshake with Vernon.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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