Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: gender equality at last, and Turkey addresses a problem at its mosques.
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

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More questions for the panel: gender equality at last, and Turkey addresses a problem at its mosques.

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and Chicago Public Radio this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME! the NPR news quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Paula Poundstone, Roy Blount Jr., and Amy Dickenson. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

M, Host:

Thank you, Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks, everybody. In just a minute, Carl listens back to Ice-T's first album, "Rhyme Pays," in our "Listener Limerick Challenge."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's not really a joke. His first album was really called "Rhyme Pays." Anyway, if you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait Wait; that's 1-888- 924-8924. But right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Paula, having tackled health care, the U.S. Congress is now focused on other kinds of reform. Among them, reform in the financial industry, environmental regulations. And this week, they held hearings to reform what?

M: I don't know, I thought they had offshore drilling hearings, didn't they?

SAGAL: No, no, no, they're too busy for that with this. They're actually trying to guarantee equality in something. They want to make sure that both men and women have an equal right to what?

M: Oh, I can't imagine.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Are they secret hearings?

SAGAL: No, no no, these were public, as - the things that they are talking about are public as well, although...

M: Oh, I know, the bathrooms in the Congress. There are not enough women's rooms.

SAGAL: Exactly, it was a hearing about restrooms, exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The Restroom Gender Parity in Federal Buildings Act, also known as the Potty Parity Law...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...will require federal buildings to make sure there are enough facilities for the ladies, avoiding those long lines you see at ladies rooms in sport stadiums and such.

M: Yes, it's a problem.

SAGAL: Also - and this is great - federal buildings will start selling beer until the seventh inning.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So that's good.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: Well, you know what happens to a lot of women, is that we then don't drink beverages when we are out, and we dehydrate.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Is that true? Is that a problem?

M: Yes, that's a problem.

M: You know, also don't run down on the field naked and things...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I've been meaning to talk to you women about that. We want more drinking, and more running on the field.

M: When we run down on the field naked, unfortunately, we have nothing to blame but ourselves.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Because you haven't been drinking.

M: Precisely.

M: Yeah, well.

SAGAL: The problem is that this law - I mean, it will apply to new construction and they will have to be retrofitted, so it won't come into effect for a while. So as a stopgap measure...

M: We can wait.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Right. No problem, just cross your legs.

M: We've got the muscles.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is true. This is the best exchange of the hearing, and this is quite real. Representative Steve Cohen, he was trying to express sympathy for the ladies. He said, quote: When you go in and you're a man, you don't have to take off any clothing, and it can be done, and you're in and you're out, and you don't do lipstick.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Darryl Issa, who's a Republican of San Diego responded, quote: Well, you're not a Californian.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: There are several senators and congressmen that - at least, there's one other one that springs to mind. What was his name?

SAGAL: Which one?

M: The guy in the Minnesota...

M: Craig, uh...

M: Craig?

M: Oh, the...

SAGAL: Oh no, Larry Craig.

M: Larry Craig.

M: Larry Craig.

SAGAL: Larry Craig.

M: Yeah. Well, he didn't put on lipstick, you know - wide stance.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But restrooms were a passionate interest of his.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Yes.

M: I just thought...

M: Well, allegedly. Allegedly.

M: Is he still there, in the Congress?

SAGAL: No, no, what happened is that he did not run for re-election, and has retired to private restrooms.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Let me ask you something.

SAGAL: Go ahead, Paula.

M: Because I don't know anything about this. What sport does he play?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Roy, the singing of the call to prayer is a staple of life in the Muslim world. But in Turkey, officials were finally forced to intervene after a problem with these calls to prayer. What was the problem?

M: I don't want a fatwa on my head, so I'm not going to say.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You're just going to remain silent?

M: Well, I'll go ahead. What the hell, I don't know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: It's like the nouveau country western song.

M: What the hell, I don't know.

M: No, I don't want a fatwa on my head.

M: (Singing) I don't want a fatwa on my head, lord, lord.

M: (Singing) I don't want a fatwa on my head...

M: Yee-haw.

M: (Singing) I don't want a fatwa.

M: ...or a big old cowboy hat...

SAGAL: But this is going to get you one so...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So the question is, if you have ever been in a Middle Eastern country, you know they have...

M: Minarets.

SAGAL: Minarets. And people call them muezzin - is their name, and they sing the call to prayer - I think five times a day, if I'm not mistaken.

M: Yeah.

SAGAL: But there has been a growing problem with this in Turkey, and the government finally decided to intervene because people simply couldn't stand it. What was the problem?

M: The muezzins are all out of key.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

M: Really, is that right?

SAGAL: They can't sing.

M: They can't sing.

SAGAL: Tone deaf.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Man, you're going to get a fatwa on your head.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: I didn't mean it. I was just saying something that I knew couldn't possibly be true, because some of my best friends are muezzins.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It was clear that one of two things was going on in Istanbul recently. Either the morning call to prayer was being led by a stray cat in heat...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...or the muezzins who sang it were tone deaf. The city's mosques were receiving hundreds of complaints every month. Istanbul's head of religious affairs finally enrolled the worst offenders in singing classes, and now can happily report they're just down to dozens of complaints a month.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They credit the good result to voice coaches Mullah Simon Cowell...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Imam Randy al Jackson and, of course, Paula Abdul Abdul.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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