Sen. Lincoln Denies Special Interest Allegations Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AK) faces the state's Lt. Gov. Bill Halter next month in a Democratic primary runoff election. Halter has charged that she is under the influence of special interests in Washington. Lincoln talks to Renee Montagne about the runoff election, and the negative comments Halter has made against her.
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Sen. Lincoln Denies Special Interest Allegations

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Sen. Lincoln Denies Special Interest Allegations

Sen. Lincoln Denies Special Interest Allegations

Sen. Lincoln Denies Special Interest Allegations

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Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AK) faces the state's Lt. Gov. Bill Halter next month in a Democratic primary runoff election. Halter has charged that she is under the influence of special interests in Washington. Lincoln talks to Renee Montagne about the runoff election, and the negative comments Halter has made against her.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Senator Lincoln, thank you very much for joining us.

BLANCHE LINCOLN: Thank you. I'm delighted to be with you.

MONTAGNE: An example he gave was you've received hundreds of thousands of dollars from big oil and financial institutions. Is that accurate?

LINCOLN: I think if people look at my record, that, quite frankly, I have stood up to some of the biggest special interests. Wall Street certainly doesn't like me. I've stood up to the health insurance industry in the health care bill that I supported and helped to write out of the Senate Finance Committee.

MONTAGNE: What do you say to those voters?

LINCOLN: Well, I can't say that, you know, I'm going to change the way my face looks.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LINCOLN: We haven't done things up here because you've got one extreme or the other who wants a hundred percent of everything that they want, as opposed to a willingness to come together and find common ground that moves us forward. And I feel like I'm a part of that solution because I've definitely stood up to my own party in many ways, but I've also been willing stand up to the other side when they're wrong.

MONTAGNE: Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas, thank you very for joining us.

LINCOLN: You bet, great to be with you.

MONTAGNE: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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