Rescuers Drill Third Hole for Trapped Utah Miners Rescuers in Utah hope to make progress on a third hole they are drilling into the Crandall Canyon coal mine near Huntington, Utah, where six miners were trapped a week ago. The relatively small holes are designed to determine the location and condition of the miners.

Rescuers Drill Third Hole for Trapped Utah Miners

Rescuers Drill Third Hole for Trapped Utah Miners

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Family members of some of the six coal miners still trapped beneath the surface at the nearby Crandall Canyon coal mine attend an English/Spanish mass at Mission San Rafael Catholic church August 12, 2007 near Huntington, Utah. Father Donald Hope encouraged the families of the largely Latino congregation to continue to pray. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Family members of some of the six coal miners still trapped beneath the surface at the nearby Crandall Canyon coal mine attend an English/Spanish mass at Mission San Rafael Catholic church August 12, 2007 near Huntington, Utah. Father Donald Hope encouraged the families of the largely Latino congregation to continue to pray.

David McNew/Getty Images

Workers prepare metal casings for 8 5/8 inch drill rig outside the Crandall Canyon Mine where rescue miners are trying to reach six trapped coal miners on August 11, 2007, near Huntington, Utah. Kyle Ekker-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyle Ekker-Pool/Getty Images

Workers prepare metal casings for 8 5/8 inch drill rig outside the Crandall Canyon Mine where rescue miners are trying to reach six trapped coal miners on August 11, 2007, near Huntington, Utah.

Kyle Ekker-Pool/Getty Images

Rescuers in Utah hoped to make progress Monday on a third hole they want to drill into the Crandall Canyon coal mine near Huntington, Utah, where six miners were trapped a week ago.

Discouraging video images, meanwhile, showed no signs of life as the search for the miners stretched into a second week.

Bob Murray, head of Murray Energy Corp. and co-owner of the mine, said there was still reason to believe the miners could be alive because the mine's roof was intact, and there was open space and drinkable water.

"There are many reason to have hope still," Murray said.

Jose Sandoval Sanchez's cousin, Manuel, is one of the missing miners. He described the family's reaction to the latest news as "ups and downs; grief and loss," patience and frustration.

"But there's so many of us together as a family that we're doing OK," he told NPR, after officials described their second failed attempt to find any sign of the miners.

The first hole was a 2 1/2 inch wide hole that rescue crews believe drifted during the drilling process into a neighboring sealed chamber. A microphone dropped into that first hole heard no sign of the miners and air samples recorded an atmosphere of only 7 percent oxygen — measurements similar to those known to exist in a sealed area of the mine and an oxygen level that would not sustain life.

The second hole measuring nearly 9 inches allowed crews to lower a camera into a cavern that officials said showed a "survivable space." But images were limited and the camera was withdrawn to clear off one lens.

A third effort would send another hole hundreds of feet down from the surface into a mine shaft along a possible escape route. That will take three to six days to finish.

Meanwhile, mine rescue teams were also trying to tunnel through the collapsed shaft where the trapped miners were working. After a week of trying, they are only a third of the distance to the men.

The cause of the collapse has not been established.

Bob Murray, head of Murray Energy Corp. and co-owner of the mine, has insisted it was caused by an earthquake but seismologists say there was no earthquake and that readings on seismometers actually came from the collapse.

Hope seemed distant in the faces of the families of two of the missing miners, who sat in the front row Sunday at a Catholic mass as Father Donald Hope spoke about them.

"Sometimes you have a good day and a bad day," Father Hope said. "But, as news comes out, their ability to remain upbeat is harder because there has been so little good news."

None of the family members spoke with reporters at the church.

But Filomena Lee, who comes from a family of miners, knows one of the trapped men and describes what she sees in the faces of the families: "They are so devastated. You know they want to reach out and think they're alive. But every day that passes just seems a little bit worse."

At the rescue effort's command post federal and mining company officials interchangeably called their mission a rescue and a recovery.

"We always have to have hope, and it would be a terrible mistake to ever give up hope before you know for sure," said Richard Stickler, chief of the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration.

Murray is adamant that it is a rescue mission.

"We're proceeding as if the men are alive and we will continue to do that until we have absolute proof as to their condition," Murray said.

With additional reporting from The Associated Press