Japan Encourages Unmarried Men To Buy Bonds Japan's finance ministry has a new ad campaign aimed at young, unmarried men. In a worrisome trend, Japanese households have been reducing their holdings of government bonds. According to Bloomberg News, the ads feature young women saying, "I want my future husband to be diligent about money."
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Japan Encourages Unmarried Men To Buy Bonds

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Japan Encourages Unmarried Men To Buy Bonds

Japan Encourages Unmarried Men To Buy Bonds

Japan Encourages Unmarried Men To Buy Bonds

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127586517/127586552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Japan's finance ministry has a new ad campaign aimed at young, unmarried men. In a worrisome trend, Japanese households have been reducing their holdings of government bonds. According to Bloomberg News, the ads feature young women saying, "I want my future husband to be diligent about money."

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

Well, our last word in business today is: what women want.

Japan's Ministry of Finance thinks they want a man who buys government bonds. The ministry has a new ad campaign aimed at young, unmarried men.

(Soundbite of laughter)

AMOS: Japan has one of the world's biggest government debt loads. But in a worrisome trend, Japanese households have been reducing their holdings of government bonds. According to Bloomberg News, the ads feature young women saying, I want my future husband to be diligent about money, and playboys are no good.

In case those messages are too subtle, the ads also say, quote: Men who hold Japanese government bonds are popular with women.

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