Lawmakers Rethink Parole Restrictions for Nonviolent Criminals NPR's David Schaper reports that across the nation, policymakers are rethinking the value of what criminologists call "invisible sentences." These restrictions limit ex-offenders in where they can live and what work they can do. As a record number of inmates face release, lawmakers are realizing there's a high cost to limiting nonviolent criminals' re-entry into society.
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Lawmakers Rethink Parole Restrictions for Nonviolent Criminals

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Lawmakers Rethink Parole Restrictions for Nonviolent Criminals

Lawmakers Rethink Parole Restrictions for Nonviolent Criminals

Lawmakers Rethink Parole Restrictions for Nonviolent Criminals

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1276613/1276614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's David Schaper reports that across the nation, policymakers are rethinking the value of what criminologists call "invisible sentences." These restrictions limit ex-offenders in where they can live and what work they can do. As a record number of inmates face release, lawmakers are realizing there's a high cost to limiting nonviolent criminals' re-entry into society.