Orphan Annie Comic Strips Ends Tribune Media Services has determined there will be no more newspaper tomorrows for Annie. In recent years, the comic appeared in less than 20 newspapers. That's unlike the 1940s, when the comic was in hundreds of papers.
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Orphan Annie Comic Strips Ends

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Orphan Annie Comic Strips Ends

Orphan Annie Comic Strips Ends

Orphan Annie Comic Strips Ends

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Tribune Media Services has determined there will be no more newspaper tomorrows for Annie. In recent years, the comic appeared in less than 20 newspapers. That's unlike the 1940s, when the comic was in hundreds of papers.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Now, we don't know if Daddy Warbucks was a hedge fund manager, but we do know that in today's last word in business, we have Daddy Warbucks and the mop-headed orphan he befriends in the long-running comic strip "Orphan Annie," because the two made their final appearance yesterday.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

The comic's owner, Tribune Media Services, pulled the strip from newspapers. It seems that the gutsy girl and her rich industrialist benefactors weren't hedge fund managers. They weren't making enough money. In recent years, the comic appeared in less than 20 newspapers.

INSKEEP: That's unlike the 1940s, when the comic was in hundreds of papers. It was so popular that when newspaper deliverymen went on strike in 1945, the Mayor of New York City, Fiorello LaGuardia, read the comic on the radio so fans wouldn't miss out.

Mayor FIORELLO LAGUARDIA (Former Mayor, New York City): Now you know poor little Annie, the orphan, is on trial for murder. And what a trial it is. Oh, the nice society people, you know? Oh, the nice society people that know so much.

AMOS: But in today's world, characters never die. They find new licensing opportunities. "Annie's" current owner says its character - who symbolizes perseverance in the face of difficulty - may be exiting the world of traditional print newspapers, but she'll push on into the world of new media, as in mobile devices - that would be a cell phone and e-readers.

INSKEEP: She will also live on on Broadway. The musical "Annie" is slated for revival in 2012.

(Soundbite of song, "Tomorrow")

Unidentified Child: (Singing) Tomorrow, tomorrow, I love you tomorrow...

INSKEEP: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

AMOS: And I'm Deborah Amos.

(Soundbite of song, "Tomorrow")

Unidentified Child: (Singing) Tomorrow, tomorrow, I love you tomorrow. You're always a day...

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