Long-Playing Records Enjoy Resurgence With the advent of cassettes, compact discs and MP3 players, LPs were supposed to have died off. The long-playing record is still around, and it's even making a comeback. Artists are releasing new songs on a format that first debuted 62 years ago.
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Long-Playing Records Enjoy Resurgence

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Long-Playing Records Enjoy Resurgence

Long-Playing Records Enjoy Resurgence

Long-Playing Records Enjoy Resurgence

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With the advent of cassettes, compact discs and MP3 players, LPs were supposed to have died off. The long-playing record is still around, and it's even making a comeback. Artists are releasing new songs on a format that first debuted 62 years ago.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business marks the birthday of a music technology that was supposed to die. Cassettes, compact discs and MP3 players were all supposed to kill it off.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

But the LP, the long-playing vinyl record, is still around - making something of a comeback, in fact. Artists are releasing new songs on a format that first debuted 62 years ago today.

INSKEEP: It took years of effort to overcome technical difficulties -like grooves that were too wide and poor audio fidelity. But in 1948, Columbia Records finally introduced the microgroove, long-play vinyl record, which could play an incredible 22 minutes of music on each side.

MONTAGNE: And according to Wired magazine, the first release was a Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E Minor, with Bruno Walter conducting the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of New York.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I hear some music coming up there, Steve. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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